Is ficus ginseng poisonous?

Ficus Ginseng plants and our pets We all enjoy our Ficus Ginseng plants, but are we really safe around them? Can we have our dogs or our cats in the same area? Our team at ficusginseng.org was wondering about that, so we did a little research on the internet and this is what we found: According to bonsaiempire.com Ficus Ginseng Bonsai plants are (sadly) poisonous for pets, and they can prove to be especially dangerous if the pets eat the leaves. So, there is only one solution: the trees should be placed out of the pets’ reach! Costafarms.com is also … Continue reading

I just purchased my first Ficus Ginseng! But what should I do next?

Congratulations for your very first ficus ginseng! But how you should now proceed? Here are some of the basic steps that you need to follow: Check the base of the trunk of your ficus ginseng: are there any small rocks/pebbles glued to it? If so you should remove them. Check the pot of your ficus ginseng: is it large enough or is it too small? Do you think that you may need to replant your tree? If so, then please read this article about transferring your ficus ginseng into another pot. Check the humidity of your ficus ginseng: you probably … Continue reading

Preparing Moss and Lichens for Bonsai use

Author – David Sweet Many bonsai can benefit from the introduction of moss and lichens–benefit in both an aesthetic and horticultural sense. Most deciduous plantings thrive with the dressings which grow extremely well beneath the shading of the trees, soil erosion is minimised, and the soil does not dry out as rapidly. This “cooperative” relationship benefits the Elm, Boxwood, Japanese Holly, Azalea, Maple, Cypress, pines and a number of Australian natives as well. In fact any bonsai preferring a damp growing medium and requiring an element to keep the planting’s soil in place will benefit from moss covering. The most … Continue reading

Improving our Bonsai – Curves

Improving our Bonsai – Curves Author – Mark Higgins The previous article discussed some of the issues concerning taper in the trunk. This is not the only place taper should be evident and must also be present in the curves on the trunk and branches and the branches themselves. I guess the easiest way to describe taper in a Bonsai sense is going from bigger to smaller – thick trunk thinner trunk, big curves smaller curves, big spacing smaller spacing.Curve LinesIt is a lot easier to introduce the curve line in the beginning of our styling and this can be … Continue reading

Why are my Ficus Ginseng’s leaves yellow/brown?

There are a number of possible reasons for this colour change in your Ficus Ginseng. Let’s start with something which might not be a problem: your Ficus Ginseng tree is going dormant just like the big ones in the woods because of the time of year. Otherwise… Not enough light: insufficient exposure to high-quality light (indirect light is what is recommended) will cause this problem. Root problem: if the roots are rotting, the Ficus Ginseng needs to be transplanted, or it could be that there is no drainage hole at the bottom of the pot. You need to remove the … Continue reading

Transfer your Ficus Ginseng to a Larger Pot

1. The first thing you need to check is whether your ficus ginseng needs to be replanted or not. You can do this by checking the roots of your tree. If the pot appears to be full of roots and there is little dirt left, it is time to replant your tree in a larger pot. 2. Use a water resistant or waterproof material and place your tree in the centre of it. Make sure that you won’t spill any dirt. 3. Time to separate the ficus ginseng from its original pot. The best way to do this is to … Continue reading

Advice for watering your Ficus Ginseng!

One of the main reasons for which Ficus Ginseng trees are ideal for beginners, is, not only that these trees are particularly resistant to disease and pests, but also that they are less delicate when it comes to watering. In practical terms this means that, whereas other bonsai trees may not survive if their owner forgets to water them on time, the Ficus Ginseng could make it (it can survive mild drought conditions, as it stores and soaks up water through its roots)… That said, you should never forget to water your bonsai tree! Misting also is very important! Ginseng … Continue reading

Ficus Ginseng gardening – basic tips

Warm humid environment A warm humid environment is essential. Your Ficus Ginseng can grow quite well in a cool environment, but remember that a warmer environment will be much more helpful! Note that it is not advisable to expose your tree to direct sunlight. You can also place a dish of water near the plant for more humidity. Place your Ficus Ginseng in a larger pot! Always remember that the size of the pot used for growing has a significant effect and determines the speed at which your tree grows. Your Ficus Ginseng bonsai will grow well for the first … Continue reading

How to Grow and take care for Outdoor Bonsai Trees

Author: Kathleen Lori Growing bonsai trees are a reproduction of basically a natural tree but only miniature. Thus it requires basic bonsai tree care in order for it to grow properly since they are absolutely dependent on you for their proper care. Whether you choose to buy bonsai trees or grow them from seeds which will make you wait for an awfully long time before you see the actual result, you will need the fundamental knowledge of bonsai tree care in order for you to have success in this form of art – growing bonsai tree. … Continue reading

Ginseng Ficus Bonsai Care

Author: GregHal This ficus has thick trunks and strong roots that make it one of the hardiest plants to bonsai. If you are interested in the bonsai hobby, I would strongly recommend starting with this tree. Although the ginseng ficus bonsai can be brought outdoors for some fresh air from time to time, it is not necessary. The ginseng ficus should be kept indoors all year round where it gets indirect sunlight. If you set your bonsai in direct sunlight, the intense lighting will burn the leaves. The temperature where you are keeping your ficus should never fall below 65 … Continue reading